Category

indigenous history
This post is written by Sabrina Moore, who will assist Dr. Boyd Kynard in our innovative Living Rivers School, that lets middle and high school -aged students participate in conservation biology research that, when published and shared, increases public knowledge of the living systems that sustain us. When we know what sustains us, we take...
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This post is written by Marysia Borucinska-Begg, an amazing addition to our Field Environmental Philosophy teaching staff, who brings with her a background that includes being a recipient of a prestigious National Science Foundation fellowship. This fellowship took her to Cape Horn, where she studied and worked with our Omora Park and University of North...
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Humans like to separate. Sometimes, that isn’t our fault- it can come down to biology. Our left brains ground us with logic, a knack for detail, and a ordered sequencing. Scientific thought thrives here, in this space where we can label and organize our world around it. In contrast, our right brain inspires inquiry, adventure, and...
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Kurt here—once upon a time (1998) I was invited by Ricardo Rozzi and Francisca Massardo to visit Navarino Island, where they were conducting conservation biology research. I am not a scientist, so while they were busy I freewalked the Dientes Range. In 2000, they invited me to be a co-founder of the Omora Ethnobotanical Park....
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