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Director’s Notes
Biocitizen began in the forests of Cape Horn, when Kurt Heidinger, Francisca Massardo and Ricardo Rozzi developed Tracing Darwin’s Path, an interdisciplinary learning-adventure that immerses students in the biocultural history of that sublime portion of the earth. With others, they established the Omora Ethnobotanical Park as a Field Environmental Philosophy research and development “laboratory”. Their...
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Biocitizen is so pleased to welcome Mason Lollis-Taylor as an Assistant Teacher in the Our Place Summer School! (More:  Living Rivers School) Mason trained with us last year, and has learned so much about teaching Field Environmental Philosophy in Western Massachusetts. After the Summer School concluded, he went to Nepal to immerse himself in Himalayan...
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Wonder – Connection – Stewardship Imagine moments from your childhood – your first encounter with the wonder and majesty of the wild – I like to remember the moment I first figured out how to dive under a wave. Do you remember that feeling of committing to driving on through the water, under the breaking wave…the...
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Kurt here—once upon a time (1998) I was invited by Ricardo Rozzi and Francisca Massardo to visit Navarino Island, where they were conducting conservation biology research. I am not a scientist, so while they were busy I freewalked the Dientes Range. In 2000, they invited me to be a co-founder of the Omora Ethnobotanical Park....
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Our Place Summer School Scholarship Program 2019 Our Place Summer School is designed to “unplug” children by bringing them into direct contact with the creatures, geologies, hydrologies and infrastructures of the Nonotuck biome and the Westfield River watershed. (Click to read the Daily Gazette article about Our Place.) Thanks to the generosity of people who...
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Salamanders, newts and wood frogs depend upon the vernal pools that appear during snow melt and vanish as the summer arrives. If you’ve wondered where these neighbors are born, and where they return to make babies, this video is a perfect introduction: Without these havens, our amphibian friends will disappear. In Massachusetts, we can certify...
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Hi! This is a note from Kurt Heidinger, Executive Director of Biocitizen. I’d like to explain how Field Environmental Philosophy (FEP) provides learning experiences that ramify and enhance traditional institutional and home-schooling education. – And why you should be one of the first and founding parents to sign your child up for Our Place Summer...
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Phoebe Gelbard has been building our school of Field Environmental Philosophy since 2015, when she was a junior at Northampton High School. Biocitizen is grateful for her service to the hundreds of students she’s taught. She’s grown with us as we experiment with and codify FEP curricula and itineraries, and is ready to become one...
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“Eco” means inhabition. “Semiotics” is the study of signs and symbols. Ecosemiotics is the study of how our inhabitations are constructed by signs and symbols—which is to say: the study of how we construct our “place” with signs and symbols. — Ecosemiotic study is a central activity of Field Environmental Philosophy. FEP “reads” the signs...
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For many of us, our first attraction to nature arose from a good feeling of perceiving beauty in flowers, waves, the sky. Bird song. This good feeling—of biophilia—is key to environmental philosophy because it inspires a yearning to perceive, and understand, nature more deeply. Biophilia is also a key element of environmental conservation, because it inspires...
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