Category

aesthetics
This post is written by Sabrina Moore, who will assist Dr. Boyd Kynard in our innovative Living Rivers School, that lets middle and high school -aged students participate in conservation biology research that, when published and shared, increases public knowledge of the living systems that sustain us. When we know what sustains us, we take...
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This post is written by Marysia Borucinska-Begg, an amazing addition to our Field Environmental Philosophy teaching staff, who brings with her a background that includes being a recipient of a prestigious National Science Foundation fellowship. This fellowship took her to Cape Horn, where she studied and worked with our Omora Park and University of North...
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“Eco” means inhabition. “Semiotics” is the study of signs and symbols. Ecosemiotics is the study of how our inhabitations are constructed by signs and symbols—which is to say: the study of how we construct our “place” with signs and symbols. — Ecosemiotic study is a central activity of Field Environmental Philosophy. FEP “reads” the signs...
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For many of us, our first attraction to nature arose from a good feeling of perceiving beauty in flowers, waves, the sky. Bird song. This good feeling—of biophilia—is key to environmental philosophy because it inspires a yearning to perceive, and understand, nature more deeply. Biophilia is also a key element of environmental conservation, because it inspires...
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Weaving the Junco: Reflections by LA Director Jesse Carmichael Places are people. Julia Gonzalez is a Yagán elder, artist, teacher; daughter to Ursula Calderon, sister to Christina and beloved great auntie. Julia is one of the few who still holds and speaks the language of the Yagán. On New Years Eve we meet her on the...
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Weaving Beauty A few days ago, I had the privilege of walking with Julia Gonzalez, Yagán artisan, and one of the last direct descendants of her people, who is dedicated to the ancestral art of traditional basket weaving. We met with her, and students and professors involved in Tracing Darwin’s Path, at the mouth of the...
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Walking and reading the land in Sub-Antarctic Chile is at once familiar and completely new for me. Growing up on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains I have walked above tree line, backpacked in relatively untouched places, and learned to read the rocks and rivers to find my way home. I am at home...
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Walking and reading the land in Sub-Antarctic Chile is at once familiar and completely new for me. Growing up on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains I have walked above tree line, backpacked in relatively untouched places, and learned to read the rocks and rivers to find my way home. I am at home...
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New Year’s Day Ice Walk— 12:30 to 3 pm   The arctic cold delivers a bonus point that is seldom redeemed—we get to walk on rivers and brooks! A very rare treat— Few walking experiences are as fun and defamiliarizing as walking river ice, first because the ice shapes are weird and magical, second because...
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